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Our Expertise

Strategic Planning 

Smart bankers recognize that strategic planning is a critical activity for their bank. This is the process where senior executives, shareholders, and board members discuss the current state of affairs and lay out a road map for the future of the bank.

While regulators are increasingly demanding that community banks have a strategic plan, it serves to create a unified vision for the bank’s goals and is an excellent tool to help communicate these goals to staff. 

The ultimate purpose of strategic planning at the board of director level is to set the overall direction for the bank over a broad time horizon. The board will examine the bank, the banking environment and the future of banking from the 30,000-foot level.  The board does not govern daily banking activities.  Their function is to set the direction for the bank and to monitor its progress.

Tactical Plan Development 

The strategic planning meeting with the board should be followed by a senior management meeting that takes the board’s vision and builds tactical plans to achieve the goals that have been set.  To bridge from strategy development to implementation requires the involvement of management to identify the who, what, when and how achieving the strategic goals established by the board.  

 

Specific goals for loan growth, fee income, efficiency, new products, market penetration, organizational changes, and staffing needs are addressed and developed into tactical action plans. 

To build a foundation for the tactical plan, it is necessary to identify some of the actions that must be taken in order to reach the bank’s growth and profitability objectives. While many items have been discussed at the strategic planning meeting, which should have priority?

 

  • Strategic Impact

  • Financial Impact

  • Ease of Implementation

  • Customer Impact

  • Competitive Advantage

  • Cost / Benefit

Performance Management​ Resources

 

Performance management includes the way managers evaluate employees, how employees evaluate their managers and fellow employees, and how individual workers evaluate themselves. The ultimate goal of performance management is to improve the quality of work in the most efficient manner possible.

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  1. Job Descriptions

  2. Interviewing Techniques

  3. Developing and Conducting Orientations

  4. Job Accountabilities and Goal Setting

  5. Performance Measures

  6. Employee Evaluations

  7. Employee Coaching Framework

  8. Leadership Development

  9. Developing Bench Strength

  10. Skills Assessments

  11. Development Plans

  12. Salary Administration

  13. Incentive Plans

  14. Employee Motivation

  15. Discipline, Documentation, and Termination

Change Management Resources

 

When your organization undertakes projects or initiatives to improve performance, seize opportunities or address key issues, they often require changes; changes to processes, job roles, organizational structures and types and uses of technology.

 

Change management is the discipline that guides how we prepare, equip and support individuals to successfully adopt change in order to drive organizational success and outcomes.

While all changes are unique and all individuals are unique, decades of research shows there are actions we can take to influence people in their individual transitions. Change management provides a structured approach for supporting the individuals in your organization to move from their own current states to their own future states.

Three Levels of Change Management

  1. Individual Level

  2. Business Line/ Department Level

  3. Organization / Bank Wide

Now, more than ever, community banks must design and implement a new retail strategy. The playing field is drastically different from only a few years ago. Banks are seeing less lobby traffic. Customers are coming into the bank less than in previous years. Many community banks are experiencing up to a 30% drop in lobby traffic over the past three years, and most see that trend continuing. 

 

Community banks’ internal technology has revolutionized a bank’s ability to provide efficient delivery of retail products. This technology has allowed banks to profile a customer and cross-sell at the point of sale. This is critical for deepening customer relationships.

Operations - Workflow - Efficiency Assessments

In today’s environment, productivity and efficiency are key to a successful bank’s profitability.  A critical element to efficiency and productivity is the number of staff needed for the bank In today’s environment, the high cost of doing business demands that a bank utilizes staff effectively.

For a bank to fully understand its staffing needs, it is no longer sufficient to just examine assets/employee. A more in-depth look at several aspects of the bank must be completed which will provide an ability to review staffing. 

In today’s environment, productivity and efficiency are key to a successful bank’s profitability.  A critical element to efficiency and productivity is the number of staff needed for the bank In today’s environment, the high cost of doing business demands that a bank utilizes staff effectively.

For a bank to fully understand its staffing needs, it is no longer sufficient to just examine assets/employee. A more in-depth look at several aspects of the bank must be completed which will provide an ability to review staffing. 

Retail Delivery

 

Now, more than ever, community banks must design and implement a new retail strategy. The playing field is drastically different from only a few years ago. Banks are seeing less lobby traffic. Customers are coming into the bank less than in previous years. Many community banks are experiencing up to a 30% drop in lobby traffic over the past three years, and most see that trend continuing. 

 

Community banks’ internal technology has revolutionized a bank’s ability to provide efficient delivery of retail products. This technology has allowed banks to profile a customer and cross-sell at the point of sale. This is critical for deepening customer relationships.

ERM Audit & Compliance

Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) is the umbrella for managing risk and includes:

                        -  Credit

                        -  Liquidity

                        -  Strategic / Business / Reputation

                        -  Market

                        -  Operations

                        -  Compliance / Legal / Regulatory

                        -  Financial

                        -  Capital Adequacy

 

The Board of Directors is ultimately responsible for overall bank governance, which includes setting risk tolerances that the bank should be willing to take. Their primary contact for understanding, setting, and testing risk is the ERM Audit committee.

 

 

Operations -Workflow - Efficiency Assessments

An operations assessment is an in-depth look at your bank's operations and will analyze the effectiveness of several areas of operations performance. It will provide a "new look" at your overall bank operations.

 

The assessment consists of:

• A review of the organization, functions performed, and job descriptions

• An onsite review of key operating processes, procedures and workflow

• Onsite interviews with a cross-section of employees

• Review of current utilization of technology and the need for enhancements

Another aspect of our site assessments will look at current workflow conditions, and identify ways to help fully utilize technology and streamline areas of redundancy.

• Centralization

• Standard Procedures

• Elimination of manual tasks

• Full utilization of technology

Productivity Model

In today’s environment, productivity and efficiency are key to a successful bank’s profitability.  A critical element to efficiency and productivity is the number of staff needed for the bank In today’s environment, the high cost of doing business demands that a bank utilizes staff effectively.

For a bank to fully understand its staffing needs, it is no longer sufficient to just examine assets/employee. A more in-depth look at several aspects of the bank must be completed which will provide an ability to review staffing. 

 

This productivity and efficiency model will look at your bank’s utilization of staff based on a number of factors, including:

 

  • Activity volumes

  • Portfolio volumes

  • Transaction volumes

  • Asset size

  • Type of lending

  • Balance sheet management 

  • Utilization of vendors

 

 

For a bank to fully understand its staffing needs, it is no longer sufficient to just examine assets/employee. A more in-depth look at several aspects of the bank must be completed which will provide an ability to review staffing.

Executive Coaching

Executive coaches provide a confidential and supportive sounding board for their clients. They ask questions, challenge assumptions, help provide clarity, provide resources, and yes, sometimes, with permission, provide advice. They often administer and help interpret 360-degree and behavioral assessments, conduct confidential interviews to help a client gain self-awareness, and establish development goals

 

Effective management is the key to a productive, efficient workplace. With appropriate leadership, bank staff is motivated to do their best work. They will be enthusiastic about their customers, coworkers, you and themselves.

 

There are three basic questions that need answers:

 

  • If successful, what would be different (better) for the company?

  • If successful, what you be doing differently? That is, what would change for the better?

  • If successful, what would be different (better) for employees?

 

With those three questions in mind, further identification of issues and outcomes that are needed are the first critical steps involved in this process. This can be used as a method to engage in positive change at the organization level, within operating systems and for personal development. 

 

  • Problem Identification

  • The Performance Balance

  • Agreement of Key Issues

  • Creating Change

  • Action Steps

  • Outcomes

Board Assessments & Training

 

Every community bank must have directors who are actively engaged in oversight of the bank and understand bank issues.  They must be able to provide guidance and management support as well as being good business professionals.  A community bank’s Board of directors has significant responsibility for setting the direction for the bank, monitoring performance and providing feedback and guidance to bank management. 


Most members of bank Boards are clearly well-intentioned and want the bank to do well.  Board members are generally selected because of their status as a shareholder, or because they are prominent business people within the community and are able to promote the bank and help it grow.

Board members need to understand their legal responsibilities, help them understand some of the fundamentals of banking and, ultimately, help them provide better oversight and governance to their bank’s management team.

Board Source Recommended Governance Practices

FDIC Board Requirements 

 

360 Assessments

 

PCI can customize a 360 assessment questionnaire for your bank's review process with the following: 

 

  • Board of Directors

  • CEO/President

  • Executive Team

  • Managers with leadership potential

 

We provide a clear overview of what the expectations are for a 360 process, including how the feedback will be used to constructively discuss both strengths and weaknesses of the individual and link to any potential coaching or professional development goals.

 

The Everything DiSC Workplace® Profile system is perfect for employees occupying any role. Entry-level employees, front-line managers, and even top-level executives will benefit from the power of DiSC. They will learn about their own personality style, their colleague's personality styles and to appreciate the differences

The profile helps people:

 

  • Discover their DiSC personality style

  • Understand other people's DiSC style

  • Build more effective workplace relationships

  • Improve their communication style

 

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Succession Planning

 

Effective succession planning has advantages for your staff members, by giving them a self-esteem boost and an answer to the question of what’s next for them. For managers and employers, it’s a proactive measure that gives them an alignment of talent development with the company’s future leadership needs.

It's a strategy for identifying and developing future leaders at your company, at all levels.

 

Succession plans are used to address the inevitable changes that occur when employees resign, retire, are fired, get sick, or die. They make sure the business is prepared for all contingencies by identifying and training high-potential workers for advancement into key roles.

 

This is a critical but often overlooked process for companies, and something they all need to continue to run smoothly. It's also a manageable event, not a major organizational crisis. An end result is a well-oiled machine with a multitude of favorable outcomes, not least of which is staff retention.

Project Management

 

As banking continues to become more complex, the need for a formal planning process becomes critical. In general, community banks are very good at customer service and doing day-to-day transactions. Bankers are good at taking the next phone call, waiting on the next customer that comes in the door, solving the next problem.

 

Bankers are not as good at implementing projects. A project involves a “process” rather than a “transaction”. Let’s face it, if a banker needed to choose between taking care of a customer or moving a project forward, it would clearly be the customer that has priority. That’s as it should be.

 

However, to implement a project “with excellence”, is important to move the bank forward. 

 

  • Defining the project goals, understanding the expected results of the project

  • Understanding who will be responsible for various steps of the project

  • Clearly defining expectations

  • Measuring and monitoring along the way

  • Measuring and monitoring success – did the project achieve what it was set out to do

 

Most importantly, a good project plan will help all affected staff understand the expected results of the project, the timeline, and their part in the project. 

 

Project planning is important. Banks need to use project planning for changes in products, organization, implementation of technology, shifts in culture and more.